Vietnam on Film

Other film photographers out there will know how precious your undeveloped rolls can be. When it comes to digital photography, there are now so many ways to save your photos (even instantly if there’s a wifi function on your camera) that it makes it more difficult to consider a computer file as “precious”. It’s a bit different with film photography. As long as your roll hasn’t been developed, your photos aren’t “safe”. Here are a few accidents that could happen:

-the film could get exposed due to bad manipulation ✓
-you could lose your roll and that’s your photos gone forever
-the development could go wrong ✓
-there could be an error when manipulating the film on the part of the people in charge ✓

I’ve only been shooting film for a year and three of the four above have happened to me. I must say, it was not the most glorious day of my life, completely exposing my very first roll because I hadn’t rewind my camera well…
As for the last two: as someone who used to work in a photo shop and handle other people’s film, I was always terrified something would go wrong and I’d be responsible for losing their precious work. You would think that it could have prevented me from making mistakes when it comes to choosing what to do with my own rolls but you’ll be surprised at the situations I’ve put myself into…

2 lessons I’ve learnt so far:

-do not confide anyone with your rolls, unless they’re also a film photographer. You could trust a person, and yet they wouldn’t understand the value of your film photographs. So always relie on yourself (a rule I also extend to life in general…)
-find one shop where to develop your rolls and stick to it; I know it can be tempting, when you’re travelling to find a shop that’s much cheaper than back home but you don’t know if their chemicals are in order and if the people working there are competent. For my part, I thought I had lost three entire rolls of my trip to Vietnam because I let myself convinced to develop them there. Thankfully I was able to bring the negatives to the one shop where I get my film developed in London and they were able to save most of my photos.

On that note, here are the photos I have rescued!! And please do leave a comment: I would love your feedback, and share your film stories!! (photos taken with my Pentax K1000)

abc_CNV00013 ach_CNV00028 adc_CNV00033 (1) aca_CNV00021 (1) ace_CNV00025 abh_CNV00018 abi_CNV00019 (1) abi_CNV00019 adb_CNV00032 aac_CNV00003 (1) aca_CNV00021 adc_CNV00033 acg_CNV00027 acc_CNV00023 aai_CNV00009 aag_CNV00007 ach_CNV00028 (1)

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